Ask the Experts

Written by Milt Miller – Every school food program comes complete with its own set of experts. That’s right you guessed it, ask your student customers what they think of their current lunch program and what they want for lunch. This exercise is not for the faint of heart or those who do not want to hear the truth. Student focus groups are brutally honest and to the point, but with the right group of students they are the best thing that can happen for fixing your program and getting students back to the lunch table.

A program we worked with was experiencing drops in participation at their elementary schools. More students were bringing packed lunches from home than ever before. Participation had dropped by 15%. We went to the experts and they told us how to fix the program. When asked, students told us they did not always like the main lunch items and they packed on the days they did not like the choices. We looked at what they were bringing from home and realized they brought “Lunchables” or PBJs most days they packed. We put our heads together and came up with a grab and go lunch, which fit the HHFKA guidelines, and provided choices for students that they could count on consistently. By the end of the first week we had increased lunch participation by 15% and by the end of the second week 20%. The students liked the fact they had consistent choices along with the main lunches.

We had a similar experience with a high school program where participation had dropped off considerably. Again we spoke with the students and they told us the lunch lines were too long and they would rather pack as it provided them more time to eat lunch. After giving the situation some thought we developed a grab and go area where students could quickly grab a packaged or box lunch and immediately go to the cashier with little wait time. Within a few weeks participation had increased 10% and the students were thrilled someone had taken their comments seriously. Customers love to see their suggestions come to fruition and they will definitely support their own ideas.

Recently a Food Service Director contacted me about a drop in female participation in her high school. Many girls were packing lunches in designer lunch bags and not eating school lunch. I suggested she speak with the girls and ask why. Their response was they thought the bags were cool and they liked carrying them. It was sort of a status symbol. I suggested she find out what they packed in their designer bags and ask if she could pack the lunches for them using their bags. After completing the research, she developed a menu the girls liked that provided several choices. She designated a cooler in the lunch room to store the lunches and encouraged the girls to pre-order, pre-pay, and pick up their lunches when they came to the cafeteria. As of last week she told me the pre-order per-pay system was working and 25 students were ordering from the cafeteria again. Many of the items provided for them to choose from were already on the menu daily. Salad, wraps, fruit and yogurt parfaits etc…

The point of this article is, in the face of declining participation it is easy to blame guidelines, but if you ask your customers what they need to see for them to participate they will provide you with the answer. In many cases the big question is, are you open minded enough to listen and then respond? If the answer is yes your cafeteria table will fill up and participation will not be a problem. If you seek the answer from the experts they will provide it.

Milt Miller is Director of K-12 Operations at Food Service Solutions, Inc. Throughout his 32 years in the food service industry he has managed, operated and assisted food service programs to become successful. For more information on this and other topics, contact Milt at www.foodserve.com/school-food-program-assessment.html.

Why Opening Day of School Can Become a Nightmare

Written by Milt Miller – The time has come for school to begin and opening day for the food program is here. My days are filled with travel and training. As I talk with cafeteria staffs around the country, I here many say opening day is always a disaster. Many say it is the most dreaded day of the year and the following week is much the same. Listening to them talk, I always make it a point to ask why they feel this way. Most have the same issues year after year, until they believe it is just the nature of the business.

When asked what they would do to improve openings, most tell me you can’t really fix anything it is just how it goes every year. Most have the same common recurring issues that no one seems to look at with anything other than acceptance that this is just how things are. Their major complaints are usually, not enough time to get set up and prepared, food items needed are not delivered or are “stocked- out” at the distributor, too much time spent on training and not enough on set-up, information overload, necessary information unavailable, necessary food for first day menus not received in time to prepare properly, and finally half of the equipment is not functioning properly. This all usually results in poor customer service, surly staff members, and disappointed patrons.

All of these issues boil down to one thing, poor planning. Planning that should be done all year leading up to crunch time is done in one or two months. Directors tell me that they are too busy to plan at the end of the year because they are closing down. They are too busy to plan during the year because they are busy making sure everything is running correctly. Others can’t plan during the Summer months due to Summer Feeding, or they only have a ten-month contract and are off for the Summer.

I guess, when I was directing a school food program, like many of the successful directors out there, I was just stupid and took planning seriously. Planning is like having a family, if you wait until you are ready or the time is right it never happens. The birth of my daughter showed me I really wasn’t ready, but more planning for how to raise her and meet her needs was necessary. I had the same type of obligation to her as I had to my employees and customers. I was obligated to meet their needs and expectations as well and that involved making time to plan, looking at problems and finding ways to alleviate them.

Listening to staff members at each training I conduct, I see several reasons why opening day is a disaster. Talking to directors of successful programs, I also see similar thinking in solving these issues. Below are several things to consider for next year, to improve opening day.

1. Look at the time available to you and use it wisely. Most school staffs are on a 184-186-day work year contractually. Most school years are 180 days on average. Use the extra days for proper close down, open up, and training. Conduct training at the end, beginning, and during the year to allow more time at the beginning of the year for set up and preparation. A proper close down facilitates a smoother open up. Use the extra days to your benefit. Letting staff finish the last day and walk out the door for the Summer is nice but not always good for the operation.

2. Plan menus for next year at the end of the previous year. If menus and order guides are set when you leave, the first week’s orders can be placed giving the distributor a heads-up and lessening or eliminating “stocked-outs.” Have food deliveries arrive during prep and set up days planned for your staff. Good planning leads to great execution. If staff is not hurried through key duties and have been given the proper tools and knowledge to do their jobs, you have time to be a manager not a babysitter.

3. You can’t fit ten pounds of stuff in a one-pound bag. Covering one-years’ worth of information in one day is foolish and ineffective. Opening week training should be kept for information necessary to open the establishment, not to make up for necessary CEU’s for your audit. Too much information confuses the issues, muddies the waters, and takes precious time from necessary duties. Not to mention, it is not effective, because they are thinking about what they have to do not what you are teaching.

4. Test your equipment well before you have to use it. Every piece of equipment should be turned on checked and tested before use. Preferably in time enough to get it fixed before you need to use it. POS Systems and computer systems should be up-dated, tested and ready for use before opening day. Oven, grills, pizza ovens, and refrigeration should be tested calibrated and ready to go before staff has to use them.

5. You can’t sell from an empty cart. Have your first week’s orders delivered in time to react to “stocked outs” and prepared for first week service. If they come that day you are at the mercy of fate. Avoid this at all costs. Running around trying to figure out what to serve at the last minute is counterproductive and frustrating to staff and customers. It makes you look foolish.

6. “Non Profit” is a Tax Status, not a Budgeting Technique. Have your Direct Certifications and new Free and Reduced Meal Applications under control. Start in July to work towards this. The biggest creator of bad debt is out of control inaccurate lunch accounts. Have Charge Policies approved, posted, and understood by staff from the start not after they are out of control.

These are just a few of the most common problems that cause opening day disasters. If you have not considered these things before, perhaps you would benefit by thinking about them for next year. Many successful directors do. Many unsuccessful directors don’t. Which one do you want to be?

Milt Miller is Director of K-12 Operations at Food Service Solutions, Inc. Throughout his 32 years in the food service industry he has managed, operated and assisted food service programs to become successful. For more information on this and other topics, contact Milt at www.foodserve.com/school-food-program-assessment.html.

30 Tasks for School Food Service Professionals to Start the New School Year

August will soon be grinding to a close. Students are preparing to return to school. Moms are doing their last minute school shopping. Sounds like summer is over and life is returning to the norm. Are you ready? For school food service professionals, both old and new, these are the days that never seem to have enough hours in them. So much to do so little time. All necessary information seems to come in the final hour as everyone rushes to get ready to start. I used to call this time the “Run for October”, as things do not slow down from August 15th to October 15th, or thirty (30) days after the first day of school. This is the time of year when great preparation makes all the difference. If you prepared last year at closing for this year’s opening you are ahead of the game. If not, here is a simple check list that may help you to get ready.

  1. Menus ready, utilizing holdover inventory and USDA commodities, as well as being checked for compliance with all HHFKA guidelines and guideline changes for this year.

  2. Menus posted on school websites and in local news media to give students and parents ample time to review them.

  3. Free and Reduced Meal Applications ready with instructions and sent via mail if applicable. They should be starting to return slowly at this point.

  4. A la carte menus and products compliant with the new Smart Snacks in Schools guidelines.

  5. Parent information packets outlining policy changes, price changes, and program changes for the upcoming year sent or made available to all parents via mail, email or social media.

  6. Staff meetings and open up production times planned and ready.

  7. Return to work notices sent to staff including menus, policy changes, guideline changes, meeting agendas, staffing changes, and meeting and start date information.

  8. First week’s orders for food and supplies, or pre-orders made at the end of last year reviewed and sent to distributors for delivery.

  9. POS, free and reduced meal software, and computer equipment updated. Students rolled forward to the next grade levels. New students and enrolls added to the systems. Computers and networks checked and running properly.

  10. POS software updated with new menu items and price changes.

  11. Price and menu changes communicated to staff, parents, and students.

  12. Direct certification letters sent to all eligible families directing them to not fill out free and reduced meal applications and to contact the food service office with any discrepancies such as children in their house holds not listed on their notifications.

  13. Direct certified students updated in F&R and POS software.

  14. All equipment checked and preventative maintenance checks completed. (Especially refrigeration)

  15. Staff training and opening meetings completed.

  16. All staff returning to their regularly scheduled positions to ready the kitchens and dining areas and to receive deliveries.

  17. All required signage posted prominently in all operations.

  18. All food and supplies received, inspected, and stored properly.

  19. Beginning inventory physical counts taken, recorded, and compared with closing inventory values from last year end.

  20. Necessary preparation and production assigned and completed for first day menu.

  21. First day for teacher’s coffee breaks and administrative catering planned setup and delivered.

  22. MSDS files updated and posted in each kitchen.

  23. HACCP plans revised, reviewed with staff, and posted in all appropriate areas.

  24. Temperature charts posted in each appropriate area.

  25. Thermometers calibrated and available in all areas.

  26. T-Sticks (temperature control strips for dishwashers and ware washing) available in appropriate areas.

  27. All policies and job descriptions reviewed and posted on employee bulletin boards.

  28. Final managers meeting to review all open up issues and to insure readiness.

  29. Final review of POS keyboards and to issue operating cash banks if applicable.

  30. Final meetings with staff before each meal period. Open the doors!

I may have overlooked a few details, but for the most part if all of these items are completed, you are ready to go. Please remember that things will go wrong with even the best laid plans, but you now can be proactive rather than reactive. Take a deep breath, pat your staff on the back, and start your first day. Please don’t relax to long as things will not slow down or settle in for at least another 30 days. If you are a CEP district your free and reduced work is completed, but you still have a considerable amount of work left to do.

I hope you have found this check list helpful. It never ceases to amaze me just how hard getting things reopened can be. No matter how long you have been doing it, it still requires much planning and hard work. Good luck and have a great year!

Milt Miller is Director of K-12 Operations at Food Service Solutions, Inc. Throughout his 32 years in the food service industry he has managed, operated and assisted food service programs to become successful. For more information on this and other topics, contact Milt at www.foodserve.com/school-food-program-assessment.html.

8 Steps to Lowering Unpaid Lunch Bills

Written by Milt Miller – As sure as death and taxes unpaid lunch bills will always exist in schools under the current systems. Of late these unpaid accounts are creating quite a stir in the media. Administrators are trying to get costs under control, but are looking like heartless uncaring individuals in the news. School food service professionals do care about feeding children first but also have to control costs in order to have a sustainable operation from which to feed them. Under the new guidelines schools that are at least 40% free lunch eligible based on direct certification may opt to employ the Community Eligibility Provision (CEP) to allow all students, enrolled in their districts, a free breakfast and lunch.  

This program has some bugs involving state and federal funding issues, but many have been resolved and others are being worked on. For schools that this program applies too and benefits, it is a great opportunity. The potential for eliminating paperwork and unpaid account balances is fantastic. Schools that qualify should definitely examine adopting this program. What about schools that do not qualify? They are still subject to the same problems they have had in the past, expired benefits, due to families not submitting a new Free and Reduced Lunch Application, resulting in unpaid balances and interruption of services. Bad press for denying students a school lunch for excessively low account balances follows on the heels of this situation.

Schools that do not qualify for CEP or those not wanting to implement it for other reasons, can employ any or all of these eight (8) steps to potentially lower and better manage unpaid lunch bills.

  1. Obtain information from your current Free and Reduced Lunch software showing whose meal benefits will expire in mid-October each year. This report should be updated and generated weekly from the beginning of the school year until the week before the cut-off in October. This will allow you to track the progress of your program to get these applications in on time.
  2. Communicate to parents and school principals who will lose benefits from failure to submit a new application weekly. Letting parents know they will lose benefits will cause a greater return earlier. Letting principals know and get an opportunity to assist with the calling of parents protects their Title 1 monies as well as grant and aid levels determined by F&R percentages.
  3. Calls weekly increase the chance of higher returns. The more you or your principals remind parents, the better chance of higher returns and less loss of benefits.  
  4. Send Free and Reduced Applications home with the students in danger of losing meal benefits after each call. Things get lost or miss placed easily. The more you keep the issue in front of families in danger of losing benefits the more it helps you.
  5. Offer special evenings to review and assist with the filling out and submitting applications. You will be surprised how this helps. People who have trouble reading and writing often fail to submit applications for just that reason.
  6. Use single family multiple child forms, but set the parameters of your software to show all enrolled student with a common address and phone number. This allows you to peer match. Many times low income parents do not list all of their children enrolled in the district. This will allow you to include these students living in that household and not listed on the application.
  7. Meet with parents of all students in feeder systems such as Head Start to explain and assist with the application process.  As Ben Franklin said,An ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure.” If you work with increasing communication at registration you increase participation in the long run.
  8. Constant communication and persistence lead to success. Keeping the issue in front of everybody insures greater returns and lower unpaid bills.

We have employed this system in several school districts and have witnessed the results to be Free and Reduced percentages in the beginning of the year to be closer to those at the end of the year, lower loss of meal benefits for students, higher levels of grants and aid all year long, and lower unpaid bill totals. These eight (8) simple steps have worked wonders in the schools we have used them in.

Milt Miller is Director of K-12 Operations at Food Service Solutions, Inc. Throughout his 32 years in the food service industry he has managed, operated and assisted food service programs to become successful. For more information on this and other topics, contact Milt at www.foodserve.com/school-food-program-assessment.html.

4 Steps for Marketing Next School Year’s Food Program

Written by Milt Miller – Menus are ready and meet the guidelines. Employee trainings and meetings are scheduled and planned. Free and Reduced Meal Applications and instructions are at the printer. The first week’s food orders are ready to go. Student accounts are ready to be added, purged, and rolled forward in the POS. Inventories have been taken, extended, and ready for next year. Staff recall notices are ready to be sent and their schedules are ready to post. Policy changes and the first month’s menus are ready to be sent to parents. Preventative maintenance projects are completed. Wow, you are thinking, “I’m good, I’m ready to go and its only July!” The real question is, are you really ready?

Most school food directors would say yes. Many would tell you that this process is automatic and they can do it in their sleep. Some would already be on a secluded beach somewhere relaxing. Some however, would be planning ways to get their customers excited and ready to jump back into the world of school food. These few would be those with the most consistently successful programs. Too many times we get caught up in the ongoing struggle to be compliant and forget the customer has been away and has most likely forgotten us. While compliance is required, without customers it is relatively meaningless. The most compliant, organized, and prepared operation without customer interest and participation, is nothing more than an empty shell.

Let’s face facts, students take time to shake off the haze of summer fun and get back into the structure of another school year. They aren’t looking forward to returning to the world of rules, regulations, and academia. They walk through the doors, on the first day, like the zombies from the “Living Dead” and remain in that state for at least two weeks after Labor Day. The real question is; can your program wait to see any real growth in participation until October? Your marketing strategies, developed and acted on before opening day could just be the spark necessary to turn the zombies to human form again!

Marketing is one of the most overlooked areas in school food. As operators we get so caught up in the rules we forget who we are there to serve. People like to feel part of things. They like to be kept informed and in the know. They are drawn by excitement. Students are people, though we sometimes forget that and treat them like sheep that need to be prodded and herded, with little or no regard to their needs and expectations. Its hard to be young and excitable. We forget this too often as we become adults. Being forced to follow rules and perform all day is bad enough, but when your only oasis in this sea of forced servitude (the school café’) is also filled with more rules and regulations, why participate? Many times we as operators treat our student customers like mushrooms. We keep them in the dark, on what great things we are doing, and expect them to happily eat whatever we tell them to eat. Would that excite you?

Marketing is the sizzle that sells the steak, the excitement that fills the room, and the concepts that meet their needs and keep them coming back again and again. Too often we overlook its importance and then wonder why our program is losing money. Developing and implementing an effective marketing strategy can be accomplished by following several steps. Below are my key steps to effective marketing.

  1. Promote when it is needed not just to say you did something. Use your monthly POS sales reports to determine patterns of low or slow participation. These times are usually from the end of August to October, from November to January, and the last week of May through the last day of the school year. Plan promotions and special days during these slow times to create excitement and generate participation.
  2. Don’t Keep it to yourself, let customers know what you have planned in advance. Develop your plans then let your customers know what you are doing. Reach students through the medias they use, email, texts, social media, and signs in areas they frequent. Send flyers home to parents, post events on your website, and text a list of special event to parents also. Send flyers to teachers, administrators, and board members, add these promotions to your board reports or request time at a board meeting to discuss them. Let everyone who is touched by your program know the exciting new things you are doing. Create excitement by letting everyone know.
  3. You can’t be great on your own, involve your staff. Share these marketing ideas with your staff and get them excited that something new is happening. The worst thing is to have a great promotion that staff members can’t enjoy with your customers. Think of a restaurant you have gone to and inquired about one of their special promotions, only to find your server knew nothing about it and didn’t suggest or inform you of what was being promoted. What a letdown. This happens with many school food promotions also. If your staff isn’t excited your customers won’t be either.
  4. Vendors and manufacturers make great partners. Involve the companies you work with, they bring added excitement to the mix. Ask for small prizes, posters or decorations that promote the products or the events. Most companies have these types of items built into their marketing budgets, so utilize them. Invite manufacturer and vendor representatives to be part of the promotion. The more new faces and bells and whistles, the greater the excitement. Remember, the more advanced notice and planning time you give your vendors the more they can and will help. Don’t wait until a week before the event to ask.

Utilizing these simple steps, you can develop and implement an effective marketing plan to bolster excitement and participation in your program. Take a little more time before heading out for a well-deserved break. You will be glad you did.

Milt Miller is Director of K-12 Operations at Food Service Solutions, Inc. Throughout his 32 years in the food service industry he has managed, operated and assisted food service programs to become successful. For more information on this and other topics, contact Milt at www.foodserve.com/school-food-program-assessment.html.

15 Components of School Food Customer Service

Written by Milt Miller – “One Million Students Nationwide have Stopped Eating School Lunch”, “Students Have Meals Taken From Them Due to Low Lunch Account Balances”, “New Food Guidelines Cause Increased Waste and Costs”, “Students Refuse to Eat New School Lunches”, “Open Campus Policy Destroying School Lunch Program”, and my personal favorite, “We’re from the Government and We’re here to Help”. Headlines, articles, and blogs like these have littered the media giving school lunch a black eye in the minds of their patrons. All of these writings outline what students won’t do or how poorly the implementation of policy has been, but none say what anyone is doing to find out what students want and how those desires can fit within the rules. A lack of Customer Service stands out in all of these articles, what happened to the age old cliché “the customer is always right?

Customer Service: the assistance and advice provided by a company to those people who buy or use its products or services. This has become a lost art in today’s society. Companies who understand customer service are the most successful and are usually in business for many years. It isn’t only the product quality or ambience of the operation, it’s the feeling people get when they believe they have made the right decision and their expectations have been fulfilled. Customer service is very hard to do and takes a major commitment. If it was easy every business would be successful. All of the above articles tell what the students, parents and program administrators do not want, while never asking what they want that will make them support the school lunch program.

Let’s break Customer Service down to its basic parts and see if what we are currently doing fits the definition.

  1. Communicate policies, procedures, products, program ideologies, and guidelines to students, parents, administrators, and the community.
  2. Utilize all resources necessary to understand patron needs and expectations.
  3. Select products and service models geared to meet those needs and expectations.
  4. Today is the time to start moving towards meeting patron expectations. Yesterday’s opportunities are gone.
  5. Operate within current rules, guidelines, and costs to meet patron expectations.
  6. Manage costs through improved purchasing, portion control, and USDA commodity utilization to provide the best affordable products your patrons want.
  7. Educate students, administrators, parents, and the community why your service benefits them.
  8. Respect your patrons as your most prized asset. Without them you have no program.
  9. Support you customer by assisting them in preparing forms crucial to insuring your continued service before that service is interrupted.
  10. Educate and re-educate patrons and staff on why you do what you do and how it benefits them. Strive to make all policies and procedures clear.
  11. Remember without customers you cannot succeed. They are your most prized asset.
  12. Voice your ideologies of good customer service to your staff until they become their own.
  13. Initiate new and creative ideas to meet patron expectations within current guidelines.
  14. Create excitement to make your program something patrons want to be part of.
  15. Educate, this has been listed three times as I believe it is the most important aspect. People fear what they do not understand. If your customers do not understand your program it looses its effectiveness.

While I agree the new guideline have been handled poorly with little end user consideration, I firmly believe its intent is for the good of all. Rather than thrash about and dwell on the bad, let’s look at how with a little more effort we can successfully serve our customers.

Milt Miller is VP of K-12 Operations at Food Service Solutions, Inc. Throughout his 32 years in the food service industry he has managed, operated and assisted food service programs to become successful. For more information on this and other topics, contact Milt at www.foodserve.com/school-food-program-assessment.html.

5 Reflections on Another School Year’s Closing

June has arrived and with it comes the end of another school year. For students, it is a time for fun and relaxation. For school food service professionals, it is a time to review, re-evaluate, and re-tool for next year. For me, it has been a year of discovery. This year has presented me the opportunity to discover several self-evident truths, within our industry, that if over looked, as they often are, cause food programs to fail. I have seen the same recurring sequences of events at many school food programs we visited this year. All are deep in red ink, with no idea how they got there. Administrators, boards, and food service directors are all asking each other the same question, why isn’t this working, we have done everything we were supposed to? We have instituted the new guidelines and we are compliant. We have joined a purchasing consortium and have great pricing. We have upgraded our equipment and remodeled our cafes, why are we still seeing six figure losses? Perhaps your answer lies buried in the self-evident truths we discovered over and over this year. Hopefully, your answer lies in the paragraphs below.

1. New Products Don’t Fit in Old Packaging
Changing tastes and trends require re-thinking how products must be presented to meet student needs and expectations. Yesterday’s sandwich is today’s wrap or flatbread. Yesterday’s sit down meal is today’s grab n go breakfast or lunch. Cultures and times have changed and many school food operators have failed to keep pace, with these changes. New healthier whole grain products require different methods of preparation and handling to produce acceptable results. Programs who fail to make the leap to meeting today’s student expectations, soon find their participation has dwindled.

2. A House Out of Plumb Will Soon Fall Down
All things shift over time. Needs change and what once was a necessity is now a stumbling block. Structures sag, frameworks bend, and sand shifts. Labor contracts, job descriptions, and labor models are much the same, as they are the frame work of the operation. Over time operational needs change and costs increase. Many operations, we visited this year had a labor model from another age when more actual hands on cooking was required. Most of their staff worked 6-7.5 hours per day, received full benefits and retirement, and followed job descriptions that were no longer relevant to the work being performed. Time had moved on, needs had changed, costs increased, but the framework remained the same and was showing signs of wear from the shifting demands placed on it. This was resulting in low productivity, a lack of understanding of the necessary work expected, and astronomical labor costs. Staff had no real understanding of what was expected of them, levels of service had declined, and labor costs, in many cases were above 65%. When asked why workers were performing tasks in a specific manner the answer was consistent from administrators, food service directors, and staff, “that is how we have always done it.” If this sounds like your operation and you do not have an HR professional on staff, seek help from an HR consultant soon. This can be the cause of huge losses for your organization unless they are fixed.

3. Computer Software and Calculators Only Work if You Know What Information You Want
Visiting school food operations throughout the year, we found most if not all, equipped with great Point of Sale (POS), Free and Reduced Eligibility tracking, and accounting software. Operators had their numbers at their fingertips. The major

issue here was that most of these high-tech operators didn’t know basic numbers that are crucial to the success and sustainability of their programs. They knew their participation numbers, labor percentage, food cost, Free and Reduced Meal percentage, and their food cost percentage. These are great things to know when you understand how these numbers relate to the success or failure of your program’s sustainability, but these numbers don’t tell you why you are losing money. Even knowing the minimum price increase required (by the use of state and federally supplied calculators) to maintain compliance with the Equity in School Lunch Act, was a number known to most of these operators. When asked if this increase was enough to cover their costs and keep them self-sustaining most replied, “It’s the amount we are required to increase prices so it must be.” Armed with all of this data and still no answers, what a shame. When asked what their average spend per student per day for labor and their average spend per student per day on food and supplies might be all replied they had no idea. Asked what the average student spend per day was in their operations all again had no idea. Once we showed these operators that the sum of spend per student per day on labor and food subtracted from student spend per day was the true indicator of how the program was doing it brought clarity to all of the other numbers they had at their fingertips. In most cases student spend per day exceeded the sum of the cost numbers by at least $1.00 per student per day. In these cases, if I were the operator, I would hope to sell no lunches each day because each sale was costing my program money! Understanding these three simple numbers can save a program. If this sounds like you, obtain these numbers and use them to manage all of the others. If you are in need of assistance call me, I will be happy to help.

4. An Unfriendly and Uninviting House is Always Empty
“If I cook it they will come”, is a philosophy long dead. It died somewhere in the 1950’s with the emergence of “Fast Food”, the two (2) income family, and increased choices. School Food has lagged behind this culture shift for well over fifty (50) years. Many operators and their staff still expect to treat their customers like mushrooms, “keep students in the dark and feed them whatever the operator wants them to have.” These are marketing and customer service issues and need to be incorporated into daily operating procedures. If student customers don’t know the great things we are doing for them why would they visit us? If when they do visit they are treated like inmates rather than invited guests, why would they return again? In every school operation we visited this year marketing and customer service were lacking. Participation covers a multitude of sins, but lack of participation is a sin. Where does your operation fit into this picture? Think about it and take the appropriate actions. Again, seek help if you need it don’t wait.

5. Knowledge is Power, Providing Needed Knowledge is Life Saving
“Give a man a fish and he will eat for a day. Teach a man to fish and he will eat for a lifetime.” This is much like saying, “Food Safety Training is politically correct, but enhanced cooking skills and improved customer service will save your program.” The safest food in the world if poorly prepared and served in an uninviting, unfriendly manner will never be eaten or enjoyed. With the opportunities provided by the Professional Standards for School Food Professionals guidelines, many times we repeat the same training over and over because we are accustomed to it and it is required to be reviewed each year. In every operation we visited HACCP manuals and ServeSafe certifications were plainly visible and current. All operations had food handling, service delivery model, and customer service issues. Food Safety is crucial, but review means review, not dwell on. Other skills drive participation and self-sustainability, maybe dwell on these a bit until they become second nature? Look carefully as you plan next year’s training, being safe but empty is not in your program’s best interests.

Reflecting on the past school year as we race through June and into July, I am amazed at the common issues we have found in the schools we visited. Many of these programs were plagued by several if not all of them. I liken the struggle for self-sustainability in school food to the struggle for independence of the original thirteen (13) colonies. All of them were plagued by the same abuses of power by a tyrannical king, while all school food is plagued by the struggles to stay in the black. Like the Founding Fathers in their struggles, we found the above truths to be self-evident in ours. What do you think? Happy Independence Day and best wishes for a successful new school year.

Milt Miller is VP of K-12 Operations at Food Service Solutions, Inc. Throughout his 32 years in the food service industry he has managed, operated and assisted food service programs to become successful. For more information on this and other topics, contact Milt at www.foodserve.com/school-food-program-assessment.html.

Ways to Produce Growth in School Cafeteria Revenue and Participation

Written by Milt Miller – As in people’s lives, school food programs are sometimes in need of help. Many of these programs are drowning in their problems, but fail to recognize they need help. I find this very hard to understand as well as very frustrating. When I was running a school food program, I was always looking for fresh ideas and better ways of doing things. I always reached out to people who knew something I didn’t and picked their brains for new concepts. Sometimes it cost some money but the revenue generated by the results far outweighed the costs. Many times when I speak with school food directors and administrators all they fix on is the cost, not the revenue it will generate. Every business, at one time or another, has to spend some money to make some money.

Another issue I find, is getting directors to admit they have a problem at all. I spoke to one administrator whose program was losing in excess of $100,000 per year, and he told me that wasn’t really an issue because they had budgeted for the loss. Thought processes like that one just make no sense to me. Another told me participation was down, but the kids would get used to the food and start liking it by next year. Really? They don’t like the products now, but they will learn to like them because it is all they are going to get?

I once had a problem with dining room monitors. Students were avoiding the lunch room because the ladies were too rigid and unwelcoming. Many parents were complaining also. So okay, I admitted I had a problem, hired a child behavioral psychologist to come in and train them, on how to handle student issues more effectively. Did it cost money? Yes it did, but the results achieved more than covered the cost and turnover at that position also dropped, which was cost saving too. Over the years I have invested a great deal of money in my staff. Not just on safe food handling skills and nutrition education, but on the fundamentals of cooking, child psychology, knife skills, and refabricating unsold products into new products to lower waste. I always focused on upgrading their knowledge in every way possible, especially the ways that would eliminate waste and increase revenue.

Directors that only provide training on politically hot topics each year, are missing the boat on what really makes revenues and participation go up. Teaching your staff how to avoid throwing food away or how to better utilize unsold products through proper food handling techniques, makes your program more money than teaching them when it is correct to throw food away. Granted, they need to know when it should not be served, but it is more important to stress how to avoid that. The more you invest in improving your program the more you reap in increased sales, participation, and increased revenues. You also have a happier more talented staff.

More times than not, the question you should be asking isn’t “Can I afford to?”, but rather, “Can I afford not to?”. School food decision makers need to look at what training and investment in their programs will provide the greatest return and growth. This development is not always just courses on safe food handling. You may be able handle food safer than anyone else, but if you aren’t selling it because you don’t know how to market what you are doing, or your staff doesn’t understand customer service or how to prepare the food to suit your customers, you still have a losing situation. Training and development shouldn’t always be the same thing every year or it stops producing growth. Many times basic staff needs are overlooked to review some hot topic that really doesn’t produce growth in the staff or the program but it is politically correct. You may receive grant money or get this training free from your state department of education, but when it is all said and done what has really been achieved in the growth of participation or revenue? I always wanted my staff to understand what it took to be compliant. I reviewed rule changes and procedures with them every day as well as twice a year at policy meetings. I did, however provide them with the knowledge necessary to produce program growth and personal growth as well. I brought in experts in marketing, customer service, food handling, produce, protein, baking, behavioral psychology, and how to effectively use student focus groups. All of this provided them with personal growth and growth to my program. The cost of all of these programs was more than offset by the return in growth for my operations.

Some successful directors are already doing this and know what I am speaking about. Sadly, too many appear to be in denial and don’t see they have a problem in their program. Many also are too focused on initial cost instead of the return on their investment. Using experts in the field to grow your program accomplishes an array of different values, knowledge, confidence, enrichment, and program growth, to mention just a few. If we focus solely on the initial cost and not the end return, we many times turn away what is most needed as not wanted.

Milt Miller is VP of K-12 Operations at Food Service Solutions, Inc. Throughout his 32 years in the food service industry he has managed, operated and assisted food service programs to become successful. For more information on this and other topics, contact Milt at www.foodserve.com/school-food-program-assessment.html.

Please Don’t Come through the Lunch Line, You Are Costing Us Money

Sadly, worrying about meal equity, participation, compliance, food cost, labor cost, meal reimbursements, and the myriad of other school lunch issues, has resulted in some school food operators feeling this way. Many operations we have assessed this year have this problem and don’t even realize what is happening. They know all of their important numbers, labor cost, cost of goods (food cost), participation percentage, plate cost, and required price increase, but fail to realize what is their “Optimum Per Student Spend”.

Optimum Per Student Spend (OPSS) is what must be received daily from every student for the operation to break even. This information is obtained by adding labor cost per day, with benefits, and total food cost per day and dividing the sum by enrollment. This is the total amount needed per student per day to cover costs of operations. Knowing this number breaks total operational costs and needs down to a more immediate level of understanding. I call this “the hundred penny theory of operations.” The theory goes, if food and labor per student per day cost one hundred pennies, then spend per student per day must equal one hundred pennies to achieve breakeven. Knowing all other numbers but this one many times leaves operators wondering why they are losing so much money by the end of a week, month, or year.

Several areas that affect OPSS are participation, cost of goods, and impulse purchases. Lower costs of goods or improved pricing strategies proportionally lower OPSS. Costing at 40% instead of 50% will lower OPSS by 10%. Many operators lose sight of best practice pricing strategies and set food costs above the national average of 40-42%. This causes higher breakeven points and lowers chances for program self-sustainability. Add on buys or impulse purchases increase student spend and facilitate breakeven. Too many times this strategy, of increasing ala carte’ sales, takes away from meals participation by making meals look less desirable. True add on buys are second entrees or ala carte items purchased with a reimbursable meal. These are purchases that add to student spend without detracting from it in anyway. When setting meal and ala carte pricing operators should set prices to encourage reimbursable meal sales and provide accessory items, with perceived value, that add on to the meal purchase. A few operators chafe at the thought of enticing students to spend more, but let’s face it, this is a business and if they don’t spend it with you they’ll spend it on less healthy items at the local convenience store.

Increased participation hides a multitude of sins. It also lowers OPSS rates. Once you have costs in line and OPSS is equal to or greater than cost/student/day, target students who currently are not dining with you and bring them into the fold. Participation insures sustainability. Keep this in the front of your mind at all times. It may never reach 100%, but it should always be in the upper 80%’s.

Breaking operations down to the hundred penny theory and understanding that daily student spend rates must be equal to or greater than daily cost/student rates, is crucial to maintaining a successful school food operation. Not knowing what your OPSS is and efficiently managing it, can lead to catastrophic losses to your program. Without knowing these numbers, it could be you saying, “Please don’t come through my lunch line, you are costing us money.”

Milt Miller is VP of K-12 Operations at Food Service Solutions, Inc. Throughout his 32 years in the food service industry he has managed, operated and assisted food service programs to become successful. For more information on this and other topics, contact Milt at www.foodserve.com/school-food-program-assessment.html.

Hidden Gold: Preparing Your School Food Program for the End of Year

As things start to wind down towards the end of the year, now is a great time to cut back on purchasing and utilize inventory.  Many times in the past, it has been my experience, that there is hidden gold buried in the freezer.  Some directors underutilize this treasure by simply listing it as “Cook’s Choice” on the menu. Others take the time to rework these items into exciting new entrees that meet the wants and expectations of their student customers. Lowering inventory not only allows you to save on purchasing, it allows you to consolidate foods from all over your district into one or several freezers and allows the others to be shut down for the summer. This results in a large savings on electric during the summer months.

Now is the time to take the suggestions from your student focus groups and look at how you can utilize this hidden gold to create excitement and new items that will be remembered over the off time. I worked with a school district during this period last year and through student comments and reworking inventory into new pizzas, sandwiches, and salads, was not only able to utilize inventory but also increased participation by 10%. At the beginning of this year participation and excitement had carried over the summer months and remained higher. The district was also able to take some freezers off line through the summer months which created a nice saving.

Utilizing this hidden treasure affords you the opportunity to find more suitable uses for products that did not work when you originally served them, and allows you to find ways to serve them as other products that your students have requested. A good equation to follow at this time of year is:      

Student Input + Outside the Box Thinking = Excitement and Increased Participation in Your Program!

Some will say this is too hard and time consuming, but if it was easy everyone would be doing it and that is what sets a great program apart for an average one!

Milt Miller is VP of K-12 Operations at Food Service Solutions, Inc. Throughout his 32 years in the food service industry he has managed, operated and assisted food service programs to become successful. For more information on this and other topics, contact Milt at www.foodserve.com/school-food-program-assessment.html.