15 Components of School Food Customer Service

Written by Milt Miller – “One Million Students Nationwide have Stopped Eating School Lunch”, “Students Have Meals Taken From Them Due to Low Lunch Account Balances”, “New Food Guidelines Cause Increased Waste and Costs”, “Students Refuse to Eat New School Lunches”, “Open Campus Policy Destroying School Lunch Program”, and my personal favorite, “We’re from the Government and We’re here to Help”. Headlines, articles, and blogs like these have littered the media giving school lunch a black eye in the minds of their patrons. All of these writings outline what students won’t do or how poorly the implementation of policy has been, but none say what anyone is doing to find out what students want and how those desires can fit within the rules. A lack of Customer Service stands out in all of these articles, what happened to the age old cliché “the customer is always right?

Customer Service: the assistance and advice provided by a company to those people who buy or use its products or services. This has become a lost art in today’s society. Companies who understand customer service are the most successful and are usually in business for many years. It isn’t only the product quality or ambience of the operation, it’s the feeling people get when they believe they have made the right decision and their expectations have been fulfilled. Customer service is very hard to do and takes a major commitment. If it was easy every business would be successful. All of the above articles tell what the students, parents and program administrators do not want, while never asking what they want that will make them support the school lunch program.

Let’s break Customer Service down to its basic parts and see if what we are currently doing fits the definition.

  1. Communicate policies, procedures, products, program ideologies, and guidelines to students, parents, administrators, and the community.
  2. Utilize all resources necessary to understand patron needs and expectations.
  3. Select products and service models geared to meet those needs and expectations.
  4. Today is the time to start moving towards meeting patron expectations. Yesterday’s opportunities are gone.
  5. Operate within current rules, guidelines, and costs to meet patron expectations.
  6. Manage costs through improved purchasing, portion control, and USDA commodity utilization to provide the best affordable products your patrons want.
  7. Educate students, administrators, parents, and the community why your service benefits them.
  8. Respect your patrons as your most prized asset. Without them you have no program.
  9. Support you customer by assisting them in preparing forms crucial to insuring your continued service before that service is interrupted.
  10. Educate and re-educate patrons and staff on why you do what you do and how it benefits them. Strive to make all policies and procedures clear.
  11. Remember without customers you cannot succeed. They are your most prized asset.
  12. Voice your ideologies of good customer service to your staff until they become their own.
  13. Initiate new and creative ideas to meet patron expectations within current guidelines.
  14. Create excitement to make your program something patrons want to be part of.
  15. Educate, this has been listed three times as I believe it is the most important aspect. People fear what they do not understand. If your customers do not understand your program it looses its effectiveness.

While I agree the new guideline have been handled poorly with little end user consideration, I firmly believe its intent is for the good of all. Rather than thrash about and dwell on the bad, let’s look at how with a little more effort we can successfully serve our customers.

Milt Miller is VP of K-12 Operations at Food Service Solutions, Inc. Throughout his 32 years in the food service industry he has managed, operated and assisted food service programs to become successful. For more information on this and other topics, contact Milt at www.foodserve.com/school-food-program-assessment.html.