The Top 3 Training Topics for School Food Programs

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Written by Milt Miller – The Final Rule on Professional Standards for School Food Professionals, has brought many needed training reforms for school food management and staff. These guidelines provide a benchmark for keeping food professionals up to date and growing in the knowledge areas necessary to perform their jobs within the new NSLP guidelines. The new guidelines mandate a prescribed number of training hours yearly for both management and staff. To comply with these guidelines the ruling provides many options for training; the three most requested programs, by our past and present clients, are Effectively Marketing Your Food Program, Purchasing and Procurement Techniques, and Understanding How to Use Production Records.

 

1. Effectively Marketing Your Food Program

Based on what we have seen while visiting schools, Marketing is the number one concern. School food professionals are very humble people, which is an admirable quality, but if they fail to let their student customers know what they are doing in their operations it can create a problem. Marketing a school food program is the weakest skill set we have observed. School food operators need direction in how to identify and reach their target markets in the manner they prefer to be reached. They also need to find the many free or inexpensive medias surrounding them in their schools that will effectively reach their students. Too often parents are not seen as a target market, but they make the final decision, most times, whether to buy at school or pack a lunch. We have shown many operators how to effectively reach and keep parents informed of the great things happening in their cafés.

Understanding and shaping the perceptions about your program is a critical piece of any marketing plan. Sending the proper message, by using the right medias to effectively reach students, parents, and the academic community within your school is key. Understanding and delivering menu items that meet today’s food trends and meet student needs, is also a key element of effective marketing for school food. Utilization of student focus groups, representation at parent gatherings, and keeping educators and administrators informed of program goals and offerings, are important factors in obtaining and sharing this information. The school cafés with whom we’ve worked have increased participation by as much as 15% in the first two weeks of implementing the skills illustrated and discussed in our training program.

 

2. How to effectively use Production Records

The second most requested topic for training is how to effectively use Production Records. This simple form has become an enigma to school food workers. The reason? An unclear understanding of the true purpose and value of this instrument. Production Records are not just a means of directing the work force or recording food usage, as is usually perceived by most café workers. This document is also a daily consolidation of necessary information for kitchen staff involving line set-up, HACCP processes and controls, meal item acceptability, cooking and holding temperature charts, portion control, and waste control. From the management side it is a great record of menu acceptability, meal identification verification, inventory control, commodity usage, per student nutrient analysis, actual cost per meal per day, and provides most of the dietary information necessary for on-site audits.

After raising the awareness of staff on the importance of this document and how simple it is to use properly, the results that usually occur are a 3-5% decrease in food cost, 10% decrease in waste, and a 10% increase in productivity. The training is about four hours, but the results in schools where we have conducted the training have been robust. Once an understanding of the purpose of this document is attained the procedures take no more than a calculator a POS items report and a pencil to complete.

 

3. Procurement and Ordering Techniques

The third most requested training is Procurement and Ordering Techniques. This has come to the forefront recently with the implementation of Policy 2 CFR 200, the policy on procurement for school nutrition operations. The regulations have always been there, but now the current administration, FNS, and USDA has decided it is time to enforce them and tie them to the administrative audit every three years. Though the regulations have changed very little, the enforcement piece is causing every SFA to be much more aware of them. We expect this training program to soar right to the top of the most wanted list in the next few months.

Basically all procurement is broken down to three types. Micro-Purchases, meaning less than $3,500, Informal Purchases, which is greater than $3,500 but less than $10,500 for non-perishables or greater than $10,500 but less than $150.000 For perishable items, meaning food. And last but not least, Formal Purchases, equal to or more than $150,000, which require either an IFB or RFP bidding process. Regulations and necessary forms can be obtained at www.ecfr.gov, or by contacting your local state Department of Education. Every food program must have its own Food Service Account that provides a clear audit trail of all revenues and expenditures. Coupled with each type of expenditure must be a procurement explanation as to why this purchase was made and how it fits with the School Codes for Procurement. The entire process is not difficult, but it is cumbersome and can be confusing. Many of our clients are frantically seeking clarity and a condensed, more understandable version of the guidelines. Most states are conducting mass webinars to explain the new procurement processes and the audits that will follow. I would suggest attending these for the overview, then conducting small group sessions with a credible trainer for the major details. We have geared our programs to assist in gaining a better understanding of the process.

As you can readily see, the face of school food is rapidly changing and a much higher level of administrative proficiency is required than in past years. If training in these top three areas is available, it is well worth the investment to seek it. Do not be left in the wake of these new rules wondering, “What can I do now?”.

Milt Miller is the Principal and Chief Innovator at Milton Miller Consulting. Throughout his 32 years in the food service industry he has managed, operated and assisted food service programs to become successful. For more information on this and other topics, contact Milt at; www.miltonmillerconsultant.com. 

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